5 Things They Don’t Tell You About Running a Foster Care Home

foster care boys playing in the front lawn
Two boys playing in the yard.

You can try to prepare for being a foster parent by reading a book or speaking to other foster parents. But often, you’ll find that people tend to gloss over the bad parts because they don’t want to sound like “bad” foster parents. After all, isn’t everyone supposed to love raising children? Aren’t they all supposed to talk about how foster kids are the best thing that ever happened to them? The fact is that a foster child might be the best thing that happens to you, but having one is also hard! So here are some foster care home myths busted:

Foster Care Home Children Are Not All Angels!

No one is born into this world with perfect moral code. So if you want your foster child to be good, you’re going to have to teach them to do it. Start by rationally explaining to them why they should not do something rather than reacting with anger.

They’re Never Afraid

Kids don’t know what to do and what to avoid. You have to teach them to stay away from things you instinctively know to stay away from, a list that includes but is not limited to blenders, knives, chalks in mouths, open flames and spills.

Each One Is Different

When you’re an adult who doesn’t have kids, you tend to think of all kids as being the same. But each one has a different personality that they’re born with or that they develop in the first few years of life. You’ll have to adjust to them and vice versa.

You Can Change Them…a Little

You can teach your foster child with the usual rewards and punishments. And you can also teach them by being a good role model. But you need to treat children respectfully, the way you would treat adults. So if the issue isn’t urgent (such as what they should wear to school) you can let it go and concentrate on the big picture.

Foster Parents Are Different

It’s not just about recognizing your foster child for who s/he is, it’s also about recognizing yourself. Don’t try to be someone you’re not or your foster child will sense it. It doesn’t matter whether you’re an effusive foster parent or a quietly affectionate one; your foster child will know when you love him/her.

Learn More About Running a Foster Care Home

Contact us to learn more about running a foster home.